Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail 72'

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floct3.jpg

Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail 72'

8,500.00

Review Copy

Signed and illustrated by Ralph Steadman

Signed and illustrated by Kurt Vonnegut

Author photo, five pages of publicity, review slip, and McGovern promissory note

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A review copy of Thompson's third book and the second of his "Fear & Loathing" accounts, in which Thompson covers the Nixon/McGovern race for the Presidency, bringing to the campaign a sense of humor and horror that is simultaneously both off-the-wall and entirely appropriate to its subject. Author photo, five pages of publicity material, review slip (which also states that the frequent faintness of the type will be corrected in the first edition), and a McGovern promissory note laid in. In the promotional material the publisher describes this book as "the last volume in a strange trilogy that began with Hell's Angels... and continued through Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," the only time we have heard of these three books being explicitly described as a trilogy. This copy is signed by Ralph Steadman and Kurt Vonnegut. Steadman, who contributed illustrations to the book, has added devil's horns, a jester's cap, and a cigarette holder to the title page illustration and has written "Part Devil, Part Jester," dating his signature on August 20, 2005 at Owl Farm, Woody Creek, the day of Hunter Thompson's memorial blastoff. Vonnegut has written, on July 28 of that year: "Hunter Thompson is the most creatively crazy of the New Journalists. His ideas are brilliant, and honorable and valuable -- the literary equivalent of cubism. All rules are broken." In addition to his signature, Vonnegut has added a signed self-caricature. Fine in a near fine, presumed first issue, price-clipped dust jacket with slight edge wear, housed in a custom clamshell case. The bibliographic history of this title is unusual, and this advance copy provides some clues to a number of the questions that surround it. In particular, the price-clipped jacket is telling: originally the price of the book was to be $7.95, as is indicated on the review slip, but the price was lowered prior to publication so that the first copies issued to the trade had a $6.95 price. The price was later raised back to $7.95. As the publisher indicates, early copies of the book were printed poorly, and the printing was to be improved upon actual publication. Straight Arrow Press was the newly created publishing arm of Rolling Stone magazine, which was still a small counterculture journal at the time, and the vagaries of the publication process were apparently still new to them. A beautiful copy of an early issue of this book, which survived to be annotated at the end of the story, Thompson's blastoff.